Future Perfect Simple

We use the Future Perfect Simple to talk about:

– COMPLETED GOALS BY A SPECIFIC TIME IN THE FUTURE

I will have bought a new car by next year.

Alice won’t have finished her studies by next year, she still has 3 more years.

Will Peter have retired by the time he reaches forty?

– THE RESULT OF ONGOING ACTIONS IN THE FUTURE

Marry will have worked for this company for three years by next week.

Marry won’t have worked for this company for three years by next week.

Will Marry have worked for this company for three years by next week?

* NOTE: We can use Future Perfect Simple to focus more on the result (Marry will have worked) and we can use Future Perfect Continuous to focus more on the action (Marry will have been working).

Compare the following:

Marry will have worked for this company for three years by next week.

Marry will have been working for this company for three years by next week.

Form

Affirmative

I/you/we/they/he/she/it

will have/’ll have

bought/finished/done etc .

Negative

I/you/we/they/he/she/it

will not have/won’t have/’ll not have

bought/finished/done etc .

Questions

Will

I/you/we/they/he/she/it

have

bought/finished/done etc ?


* NOTE: Negative questions are also possible. We generally use them to show surprise, disbelief, or shock.

Won’t Joanna and Tim have graduated by the time they get married?


* NOTE: We often use for and since with perfect tenses to specify the duration of the time.