Future Perfect Continuous

We use the Future Perfect Simple to talk about ongoing repeated actions in the future, and predictions of actions in the future. If you would like to learn more about this tense, you’ve come to the right place. Feel free to look around, learn, and practice.

future peferct continuous

We use the Future Perfect Continuous to talk about:

- ONGOING AND REPEATED ACTIONS IN THE FUTURE

I will have been coming to this gym for a year in June.

Paul won’t have been working for the company for two months tomorrow, he’s still quite new.

Will Sandy have been playing tennis for four years in June?

- PREDICTIONS OF ACTIONS IN THE FUTURE

I think Nancy will have been driving longer than Judy.

I think Nancy will not have been driving longer than Judy.

Will Nancy have been driving longer than Judy?

* NOTE: We can use Future Perfect Continuous to focus more on the action and we can use Future Perfect Simple (Tyler will have read) to focus more on the action (Tyler will have been reading).

Compare the following:

Tyler will have read his new novel in a month.

Tyler will have been reading his new novel for a month.

Affirmative
I/you/we/they/he/she/it will have been/’ll have been working/doing/reading etc .
Negative
I/you/we/they/he/she/it will not have been/won’t have been/’ll not have been working/doing/reading etc .
Questions
Will I/you/we/they/he/she/it have been working/doing/reading etc ?

* NOTE: Negative questions are also possible. We generally use them to show expectation.

Won’t John have been walking the dog by the time you get home?

* NOTE: We often use for and since with perfect tenses to specify the duration of the time.